The Comfort Zone in BSF Techno

A young woman standing with her arms crossed wearing a plum handknit poncho.

Everyone reaches for different projects – or crafts – for different reasons. While working on my Masters in Library Science, I knit almost exclusively socks, in fact I was cranking out almost a pair per week due to the train commute and the long lectures. In the dead of winter, I find myself reaching for colors that I don’t find often in the winter wonderland outside my door. For whatever reason, summer often has me reaching for thicker wools and larger projects. Despite the hot June that summer brought, the cooler July weather had me dreaming of being wrapped in something warm and fuzzy. Add that to procrastinating a lace shawl I’ve been slowly working on for months (more on that soon, I promise!), and the Comfort Zone poncho by Espace Tricot found its way off my queue and onto my needles. Especially as we transition back to working from our cool (yes even in winter) offices.

Confession time: I’ve never actually knit with Blue Sky Fibers’ Techno before. There isn’t really a good reason for this outside of “I don’t work with bulky or single ply yarns frequently”. That being said, when deciding to cast on the Comfort Zone, I found myself thinking about how warm and snuggly the fabric Techno would create. Plus, being a Blue Sky Maker for a little bit longer means that it’s the perfect time to try new yarn.

Actually knitting with Techno is so much fun, possibly because of the ease in which new strands spit slice together and possibly because it feels like you’re knitting from a cloud. Though fuzzy in nature, Techno does not tickle my nose the way some alpaca yarns do and I don’t feel the need to reach for a lint roller after knitting on my lunch break.

A young woman standing sideways to the camera holding the bottom edge of her plum poncho away from her body.

The Comfort Zone knit up both faster and slower than I thought it would, whether that’s because I anticipate thicker yarns knitting up quicker or not is a toss up. In order to make something that provides a little more movement in the arms, I modified the sizing of the pattern a little bit. Knowing that alpaca and alpaca blends tend to create a heavy drapey fabric, I cast on for size 1 and knit until the ribbing was 4 inches (instead of 6). Then, I increased up to the size 2 stitch count (104 to be exact), which is 4 rows longer than the plan rows following the increases call for. Knowing that the final ribbing would add 5 inches, I measured my poncho with a goal of having around 12 inches and discovering that I had 14. I started the bottom ribbing without knitting any extra rows.

Now that the Comfort Zone is off my needles, I find myself wondering what else I can add to my wardrobe in Techno (Tamarack Blanket Scarf perhaps? Or a sweatshirt style sweater in Club Grey?). The bloom induced by wet blocking has created this feeling of wool armor that’s designed to keep me safe from the cold. Though I’m not one to rush the summer months away, I do find myself looking longingly at the Comfort Zone each time I enter my closet. Is it my fault that I’m happy with the fabric and the fit?

Calgary Capelet KAL Wrap-up

After almost three months of enthusiastically knitting and watching everyone’s progress, it’s hard to believe that we’re entering the final week of the Calgary Capelet KAL. It’s been so much fun to interact with everyone who has joined us along the way and I hope you’re all as happy with your capelets as I am!

In true Paige fashion, I have a couple of modifications to share. Knowing that I wanted my capelet to be a little longer than what the pattern called for, I slowed down the frequency of the decreases in the beginning. To be more specific, I decreased evenly across every 4th row instead of every other row for the first seven decreases. This does make the bottom of the capelet a little bit wider in addition to longer, but I find myself enjoying the added drape.

Since the pattern doesn’t provide this information, I also wanted to mention that I worked 5 inches for the neck before the final ribbing.

Thank you so much for joining us! Make sure to post an image of your final piece to any of Blue Sky Fiber’s social channels to be entered into the grand prize drawing: a year (1 per month) supply of patterns, that’s 12 digital patterns of your choice!

Close up of a woman's torso wearing a green capelet with a cable down the front center.
Calgary Capelet Front
Close up of a woman's torso from behind. She's wearing a green capelet with a cable down the back center.
Calgary Capelet Back